Hanging Out

Sam Hockley-Smith:
Thinking about stuff,
Maybe posting pictures
dadushin:

A small comic I did for the NYT Private Lives blog. This is the probably the first comic I’ve done since I was 5 years old and I’m happy I got to do it for something close to my heart. Many thanks to my AD Sarah Williamson at the Times.

dadushin:

A small comic I did for the NYT Private Lives blog. This is the probably the first comic I’ve done since I was 5 years old and I’m happy I got to do it for something close to my heart. Many thanks to my AD Sarah Williamson at the Times.

(via exitsmiling)

A brief aside: Dev Hynes (Blood Orange) is sometimes criticized as not ‘R&B’ enough by some music writers—these writers often cite Dev’s previous work in rock band Test Icicles as indicative of some illegitimacy of intention. But Dev’s songwriting trademark—his supposed weakness—is rooted in this exact thing, the weighting of syllables. Unlike most R&B, Dev writes songs where the melody has no syncopation; they sound like hymns. Boring, perhaps, to you, but other people (myself included) hear a glorious religious calm, a stateliness.

Similarly, think about Black Sabbath’s ‘Paranoid,’ where almost every note is off the beat. ‘FI-nished with my woman cause sheeee WOULDn’t help meeeee WITH myyyy LIFE.’ It’s kind of a bad melody, no? Doesn’t suit the lyrics at all, has an vaguely ESL vibe, weighted all wrong. But the song is called ‘Paranoid’ and he is singing about how you should enjoy life and how he wishes he could do the same but it’s too late. It suits the material, works great.

—Owen Pallett casually drops this gem in a great Slate article in which he uses music theory to explain the omnipresence of Katy Perry’s “Teenage Dream.” (via marathonpacks)